Homeschool Demographic Shift

July, 2017

POST- Homschool Demographic Shift

Shift in student population by race. Minorities are showing increased growth.

Homeschool demographics are more diverse than they have ever been. Several studies indicated that Whites encompassed 96% of all homeschoolers in the 1980-1990s. However, more recent studies conducted by the (NCES) in 2012 indicate that Whites now encompass only 69% with Hispanics increasing to 15% and Blacks growing to 8% of all homeschoolers. The growth shows a that then number of Blacks doubled and the number of Hispanics tripled compared to numbers from just one decade prior. In addition to racial demographic shifts there is also evidence to show that the tradition Christian dominance that homeschool is commonly associated with, is shifting to a more diverse religious environment with Jewish and Muslim numbers also increasing. Without a doubt, more people from all backgrounds and demographics are seeing the value in the individualized instruction and lower student to teacher rations that home school offers.

The final demographics of students are those with disabilities and special needs whose US population is just over 13%. Charter schools are under fire as they only have an enrollment of 8-10%, while 16% of homeschoolers, are special needs or disabled.  One would think that as a result of having a higher proportion of these students would lead to overall lower test scores; however, the data shows that home schoolers outscore both public and private schools on SAT scores and outscore public schools on ACT test scores. With record numbers of youth being diagnosed as children on the Autism spectrum, the choice appears to be clear.

-Adolfo

References

Heuer W., Donovan, W. (2017). Homeschooling: The Ultimate School Choice.

Pioneer Education. Retrieved from http://pioneerinstitute.org/

Autism Speaks Staff. (2015). Shift in diagnosis only partly explains rise in autism prevalence. Retrieved from https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/shift-diagnosis-only-partly-explains-rise-autism-prevalence